Darius Bost

Darius Bost

Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies, University of Utah
Fall 2020: Richard D. Cohen Fellow
Darius Bost

Darius Bost is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies in the School for Cultural and Social Transformation at the University of Utah, and co-editor of Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies. His research focuses in the areas of black cultural studies; feminist, gender, and sexuality studies; and medical humanities.  Bost is the author of the award-winning book, Evidence of Being: The Black Gay Cultural Renaissance and the Politics of Violence  (University of Chicago Press, 2018). Related research has been published in Criticism,  Journal of American History,  Journal of West Indian Literature, Occasion, Palimpsest, Souls, The Black Scholar, and several edited collections. His research has been supported by the Eccles Centre at the British Library; Woodrow Wilson Foundation; Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity, and Gender in the Social Sciences at Duke University; President's Office and the Office of Research and Sponsored Programs at San Francisco State University; Martin Duberman Visiting Scholars Program at the New York Public Library; and Provost’s Office at the University of Pennsylvania. As a Hutchins Fellow, Bost will be at work on Diasporic Perversions: Black Queer Visual Cultures and the Politics of History, an interdisciplinary study of queer photographic practices across the Anglophone black diaspora from the 1970s to the present. 

Diasporic Perversions: Black Queer Visual Cultures and the Politics of History 

Diasporic Perversions: Black Queer Visual Cultures and the Politics of History documents black feminist, queer, and trans diasporic visual cultures in the United States, Canada, the U.K., and Jamaica from the 1970s to the present. The project focuses on artists such as Alvin Baltrop, Glenn Ligon, Lyle Ashton Harris, Ajamu, Rotimi Fani-Kayode, Ingrid Pollard, Abdi Osman, Ebony G. Patterson, Lawrence Graham-Brown, O’Neil Lawrence, Kia Labeija, and Tourmaline to locate a black queer aesthetic tradition in the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries while demonstrating how queerness has been central to the black Atlantic cultural and political imagination. The manuscript explores how these artists have mobilized a politics of perversion to imagine a black queer Atlantic amid the historical ruptures and geographic dislocations produced by socioeconomic, political, and cultural dispossession.