Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race

The Du Bois Review (DBR) is a scholarly, multidisciplinary, and multicultural journal devoted to social science research and criticism about race. Launched in the spring of 2004, the journal provides a forum for discussion and increased understanding of race and society from a range of disciplines, including but not limited to economics, political science, sociology, anthropology, law, communications, public policy, psychology, linguistics, and history.

Current Issue

Race has sticky properties. Much like the classic 'tar baby' encountered in the Uncle Remus and Br'er Rabbit tales, once you make the error of putting a hand in or on it, it becomes very hard to extract one's self from the incredibly adaptive and adhesive grasp of race.

A number of the articles in our current issue, "Racial Inequality Re-articulated" (11.2) identify and unpack the ways in which the stickiness of race operates.

Thumbnail for Du Bois Review Issue 11.2

Du Bois Review Issue 11.2

Race has sticky properties. Much like the classic 'tar baby' encountered in the Uncle Remus and Br'er Rabbit tales, once you make the error of putting a hand in or on it, it becomes very hard to extract one's self from the incredibly adaptive and adhesive grasp of race.

Thumbnail for Du Bois Review Issue 11.1

Du Bois Review Issue 11.1

Our Spring 2014 issue entitled “Race in a ‘Postracial’ Epoch” (11.1) highlights the relevance of political philosophy and political theory to ongoing debates about postracialism.

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