The Black Calendar

Below please find a list of campus events that may be of interest. CLICK HERE for the calendar of only
Hutchins Center events.

Events on this page are pulled directly from the Havard Gazette Calendar. To submit a Harvard event, please click here.

Faith & Life Forum, Robert W. Lee IV

Buttrick Room in the Memorial Church
Sun., Feb. 11, 2018, 9:30 – 10:30 a.m.

Faith & Life Forum, Robert W. Lee IV

The Faith & Life Forum explores matters of faith and public life. This term, we will continue to explore the theme of "Redefining Success: Living a Life of Sacrifice and Service” through readings, discussion, interviews, and lectures. Come for coffee at 9:00 a.m.

Gazette Classification: Humanities, Religion, Support/Social
Organization/Sponsor: The Memorial Church
Speaker(s): Robert W. Lee IV, a descendant of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, who was forced to step down as pastor of a church in North Carolina after denouncing racism and voicing support of Black Lives Matter.
Cost: Free and open to the public
Contact Info: The Memorial Church of Harvard University,, 1 Harvard Yard, Cambridge, MA 02138, P: 617-495-5508
More infomemorialchurch.harvard.edu…

Ladysmith Black Mambazo

Sanders Theatre
Sun., Feb. 11, 2018, 3 p.m.

Ladysmith Black Mambazo

With the power of gospel and the precision of Broadway, Ladysmith Black Mambazo is the undisputed king of mbube, South African a cappella singing.

Gazette Classification: Music
Organization/Sponsor: World Music / CRASHarts
Cost: Full price: $48, $37, $32, $28
Ticket Web Linkwww.boxoffice.harvard.edu
Ticket Info: The Harvard Box Office 617-496-2222
More infowww.boxoffice.harvard.edu…

“Colonial Capital and the End of Empire: British Business and the Formation of an East Pakistani 'National Economy'"

Robinson Hall, Lower Library, 35 Quincy St., Cambridge
Mon., Feb. 12, 2018, 4 – 6 p.m.

 British Business and the Formation of an East Pakistani 'National Economy'"

The precirculated paper will be available by request to jbarnard@fas.harvard.edu approximately one week ahead of time.

Gazette Classification: Classes/Workshops, Lecture, Social Sciences
Organization/Sponsor: Weatherhead Initiative on Global History, A Research Cluster on Global Transformations
Speaker(s): Tariq Omar Ali, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Commentator: Emmanuel K. Akyeampong, Ellen Gurney Professor of History and Professor of African and African American Studies, Harvard University
Contact Infojbarnard@wcfia.harvard.edu
More infowigh.wcfia.harvard.edu…

Kevin Jerome Everson Short Films

Harvard Film Archive
24 Quincy Street
Mon., Feb. 12, 2018, 7 – 8:30 p.m.

Kevin Jerome Everson Short Films

Sugarcoated Arsenic: Co-directed and written by Everson’s UVA colleague, African-American historian Claudrena N. Harold, Sugarcoated Arsenic takes as its starting point a moving speech on civil rights performed by Vivian Gordon during her tenure as the director of University of Virginia’s Black Studies program between 1975 and 1980. Then, as in Emergency Needs, Everson juxtaposes the historical record alongside a nearly identical recreation, in this case starring actress Erin Stewart. The mock-vérité monochrome images of socializing and camaraderie taken on the university campus are some of Everson’s most resonant, and nowhere more so than in the montage of “Black Power” marches that concludes the film.

Rhino: Revisiting the subject of his 2012 film Rhinoceros, Everson’s latest imagines the final days of sixteenth-century Italian Duke Alessandro de’ Medici, a historical figure of particular interest to the director for being the son of an African servant woman. Working in digital on location in Italy, Everson stages crudely theatrical episodes featuring actors performing as historical figures within modern settings, then intercuts these unorthodox dramatizations with documentary footage of African migrants in the region. The stark juxtaposition, which recalls the work of Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet, connects ancient history and today’s Europe in a shared plague of intolerance—a sobering outlook at a time when blinkered reactions to refugee crises around the globe run rampant.

North: A single unremarkable scenario—a man attempts to unfold a map while battling against gusts of wintry wind—becomes a microcosm for a number of recurring Everson preoccupations, chiefly the widespread migration of Blacks from the South to the Midwest following WWII.

The Reverend E. Randall T. Osborn, First Cousin: Martin Luther King Jr.’s first cousin speaks in an archival clip about race riots in Cleveland in the late sixties, but Everson re-edits the footage to amplify the presence of the black reporter questioning him, multiplying one sympathetic reaction shot to emphasize the procedure involved in moderating the interview.

Sound That: Everson’s fascination with manual labor institutions in Ohio and his ability to find poetry in the mundane is on full display in this immersive procedural tracking the Cleveland Water Department’s efforts to locate leaks in underground infrastructure.

Gazette Classification: Film
Open to: Public and Harvard community
Category: Film
Library LocationHarvard Film Archive
More infohcl.harvard.edu…

Sr. Helen Prejean at the Harvard Law Forum

Harvard Law School, 1585 Mass. Ave., Cambridge
Tue., Feb. 13, 2018, 12 – 1 p.m.

Sr. Helen Prejean at the Harvard Law Forum

Sr. Helen Prejean is the nation's leading death penalty abolitionist. She is the author of the bestselling book Dead Man Walking, which was made into an Oscar-winning movie with Susan Sarandon and Tim Robbins.

She is coming to Harvard Law School to share her experience and wisdom from a life of fighting abolish the death penalty.

The event is open to the public and pizza will be provided. Contact PeDavis@jd18.law.harvard.edu for more information.

Gazette Classification: Law, Lecture, Social Sciences
Organization/Sponsor: Harvard Law Forum
Speaker(s): Sr. Helen Prejean
Contact Info: Pete Davis, PeDavis@jd18.law.harvard.edu, 347-453-3135
More infowww.facebook.com…

In Conversation with Marla Frederick

Common Room, CSWR, 42 Francis Ave.
Tue., Feb. 13, 2018, 12 – 1 p.m.

Marla Frederick is Professor of African and African American Studies and the Study of Religion at Harvard University. She is the author of Between Sundays: Black Women and Everyday Struggles of Faith, a richly detailed ethnography exploring the complex lives and faith commitments of women in rural North Carolina.

In this continuing series, faculty members explore their intellectual and spiritual autobiographies with attention to the ways in which they have intersected, cohered, collided, and deepened over the course of their careers. From these presentations and the ensuing conversations, we hope to identify some of the key intellectual, spiritual, and physical practices we all might develop to remain supple and responsive to the urgent moral demands of this world and to the pressing responsibilities of professional and personal life.

This series is open to all.

Soup will be served. Please bring your own beverage.

Gazette Classification: Religion
Sponsor: Office of the Chaplain and Religious and Spiritual Life
Contactrsl@hds.harvard.edu

The Activist Collector: Recovering the Story of an African American Woman in Pre-Apartheid South Africa

Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy St., Cambridge
Wed., Feb. 14, 2018, 12 – 1:30 p.m.

 Recovering the Story of an African American Woman in Pre-Apartheid South Africa

A Q+A session will follow the talk.

Gazette Classification: Humanities, Lecture
Organization/Sponsor: The W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research
Speaker(s): Christa Clarke, Senior Curator, Arts of Global Africa at the Newark Museum
Cost: Free & open to the public
Contact Infohutchinscenter@fas.harvard.edu
More infohutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu…

The Racial Imaginary and American Poetry: A Lecture by Claudia Rankine

Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
Knafel Center
10 Garden St.
Cambridge
Thu., Feb. 15, 2018, 4:15 – 5:30 p.m.

 A Lecture by Claudia Rankine

In this talk, Rankine will read from her award-winning book, "Citizen: An American Lyric" and discuss how racial imaginaries assert themselves in the history of American poetry. Register online.

For "Citizen," Rankine won a Forward Prize for Poetry, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Award, the PEN Open Book Award, and the NAACP Image Award. "Citizen" also holds the distinction of being the only poetry book to be a New York Times best-seller in the nonfiction category.

Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry and two plays. She has also taken part in numerous video collaborations and is the editor of several anthologies, including "The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind."

Gazette Classification: Humanities, Lecture, Poetry/Prose, Special Events
Organization/Sponsor: Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
Speaker(s): Claudia Rankine, Award-Winning Poet; Chancellor, Academy of American Poets; Frederick Iseman Professor of Poetry, Yale University
Cost: Free
Contact Infoevents@radcliffe.harvard.edu
More infowww.radcliffe.harvard.edu…

Timeless Portraits and Dreams: Pianos for Geri

Paine Hall, 3 Oxford St, Cambridge
Fri., Feb. 16, 2018, 8 p.m.

 Pianos for Geri

Timeless Portraits and Dreams: A Festival/Symposium in Honor of Geri Allen.
Pianos for Geri: A performance curated by Vijay Iyer and featuring composer-pianists Kris Davis, Craig Taborn, Jason Moran, and Iyer in solo and duo configurations.

Gazette Classification: Concerts, Conferences, Music
Organization/Sponsor: Cosponsors of the Festival/Symposium include the Jazz Research Initiative of the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, the Music Department, Office of the Provost, the Dean of Arts and Humanities, the Associate Provost for the Arts, and the Office for the Arts
Cost: Event is free. Tickets Required. Limit of 2 tickets per person . Tickets valid until 7:45PM. Available by phone and internet for a fee. Call 617-496-2222 or reserve on line at www.boxoffice.harvard.edu
Ticket Web Linkwww.boxoffice.harvard.edu
Ticket Info: The Harvard Box Office 617-496-2222

Obama and Kenya: Contested Histories and Politics of Belonging

Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy St., Cambridge
Wed., Feb. 21, 2018, 12 – 1:30 p.m.

 Contested Histories and Politics of Belonging

A Q+A session will follow the talk.

Gazette Classification: Humanities, Lecture
Organization/Sponsor: The W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research
Speaker(s): Kate Luongo and Matt Carotenuto, authors of Obama and Kenya: Contested Histories and Politics of Belonging
Cost: Free & open to the public
Contact Infohutchinscenter@fas.harvard.edu
More infohutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu…

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