The Black Calendar

Below please find a list of campus events that may be of interest. CLICK HERE for the calendar of only
Hutchins Center events.

Events on this page are pulled directly from the Havard Gazette Calendar. To submit a Harvard event, please click here.

[A] tone of voice peculiar to New-England”: Fugitive Slave Advertisements and the Heterogeneity of Enslaved Blacks in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Quebec

Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy St., Cambridge
Wed., Jan. 24, 2018, 12 – 1:30 p.m.

 Fugitive Slave Advertisements and the Heterogeneity of Enslaved Blacks in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Quebec

A Q+A session will follow the talk.

Gazette Classification: Humanities, Lecture
Organization/Sponsor: The W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research
Speaker(s): Charmaine Nelson, Professor of Art History, Department of Art History and Communication Studies, McGill University; William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Harvard University
Cost: Free & open to the public
Contact Infohutchinscenter@fas.harvard.edu
More infohutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu…

Study Group: Practitioners in American Democracy

Ash Center Conference Room #226, Suite 200-North, 124 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge
Thu., Jan. 25, 2018, 4:30 – 6 p.m.

 Practitioners in American Democracy

Join Miles Rapoport, Senior Practice Fellow in American Democracy at the Ash Center, for a spring semester study group with practitioners in the field of democratic governance. Study group participants will hear from advocates, organizers, elected officials, and policy innovators, and have the opportunity to discuss the latest strategies and leading organizations promoting democratic institutions and norms. Study group sessions are open to all Harvard ID holders. Refreshments will be provided.

The inaugural study group session will feature Wendy Fields, Executive Director of the Democracy Initiative (DI). She brings over 25 years of experience as a trainer, organizer, and strategist to the DI with a special focus on economic and racial equality. Prior, she was the Vice President of Strategic Campaigns and Partnerships at Common Cause. She also spent 17 years at United Automobile Workers (UAW) including serving as Chief of Staff to President Bob King. Fields will discuss with study group participants the ways in which organizations can bring effective strategies for organizing and mobilizing to the critical issues of American Democracy today.

Gazette Classification: Social Sciences
Organization/Sponsor: The Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
Speaker(s): Wendy Fields, Executive Director of the Democracy Initiative (DI)
Cost: Free
Contact InfoInfo@ash.harvard.edu
More infoash.harvard.edu…

Human Rights: Adapting to the Challenges of Our Times

Starr Auditorium, Belfer Building, 79 John F. Kennedy St., Cambridge
Sat., Jan. 27, 2018, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

 Adapting to the Challenges of Our Times

Human Rights: Adapting to the Challenges of Our Times is a student-led Symposium aiming to rethink the effective implementation of human rights in an age of increasing populism and nationalism.

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP is required. Seating is limited.

Gazette Classification: Special Events
Organization/Sponsor: The Symposium is organized with the support of the Carr Center for Human Rights, the Committee on Ethnicity, Migration, Rights, the Department for African and African American Studies, the FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School, HKS Office for Student Diversity and Inclusion, the Human Rights Professional Interest Council and the Muslim Caucus (student organizations at Harvard Kennedy School), the Kennedy School Student Government, and the South Asia Institute.
Ticket Web Linkwww.hrsymposium.info…
More infowww.hrsymposium.info

“The Thunderous Consonance of Drums”: Black Festivity in Colonial Brazil

Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy St., Cambridge
Wed., Jan. 31, 2018, 12 – 1:30 p.m.

 Black Festivity in Colonial Brazil

A Q+A session will follow the talk.

Gazette Classification: Humanities, Lecture, Music
Organization/Sponsor: The W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research
Speaker(s): Genevieve E. Dempsey, Ethnomusicologist and Musician
Cost: Free & open to the public
Contact Infohutchinscenter@fas.harvard.edu
More infohutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu…

Tonsler Park

Harvard Film Archive
24 Quincy Street
Fri., Feb. 2, 2018, 7 – 8:30 p.m.

Tonsler Park

The contentious 2016 presidential election has been a hot talking point for almost a year now, and yet Everson’s Tonsler Park, which documents polling station workers in the eponymous Charlottesville, VA precinct on November 8th, stubbornly resists being read as any kind of cultural barometer. Seemingly eschewing topical issues altogether (the words “Trump” and “Clinton,” for instance, are never heard), the film instead bears witness to the mundanity of the polling process, the hours burned away staring at computer screens and reciting the same pleasantries to voters over and over. What ultimately politicizes this unorthodox conceptual documentary is its choice of setting, not only for it being the notorious site of racist commotion just months later but for the predominantly African-American populace, a considerable sample of which become the subjects of Everson’s unblinking gaze. As non-synced ambience from the room hums away on the soundtrack, the director trains his telephoto lenses on the faces of these generous workers, all doing their part, however dispassionately, to ensure democracy is preserved.

Gazette Classification: Film
Open to: Public and Harvard community
Category: Film
Library LocationHarvard Film Archive
More infohcl.harvard.edu…

Mumiani: Extraversion and Organ Theft Rumor in Coastal Kenya

Thompson Room, Barker Center, 12 Quincy St., Cambridge
Wed., Feb. 7, 2018, 12 – 1:30 p.m.

 Extraversion and Organ Theft Rumor in Coastal Kenya

A Q+A session will follow the talk.

Gazette Classification: Humanities, Lecture
Organization/Sponsor: The W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research
Speaker(s): Zebulon Dingley, Doctoral candidate in Anthropology and History, University of Chicago
Cost: Free & open to the public
Contact Infohutchinscenter@fas.harvard.edu
More infohutchinscenter.fas.harvard.edu…

The Princess and the Frog

Harvard Film Archive
24 Quincy Street
Sat., Feb. 10, 2018, 3 – 4:30 p.m.

The Princess and the Frog

Ironically it was John Lasseter, the founder of Pixar—acquired by Disney in 2006—who finally reinstated Disney’s ousted hand-drawn animation department. After a five-year hiatus, Ron Clements and John Musker—the animation duo of The Little Mermaid (1989)—were able to release their traditionally animated, musical version of a Brothers Grimm story about the potential dangers of kissing a frog, with some important changes. As The New York Times bluntly proclaimed, “For the first time in Walt Disney animation history, the fairest of them all is black.” Seventy-two years after Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Disney tried to make up for its stereotyping sins of the past by presenting Tiana in 1920s New Orleans as a feisty, headstrong waitress who is sidetracked from her dream of opening her own restaurant by Prince Naveen, a smooth-talking frog. Upon the inevitable kiss, she too transforms. Accompanied by Randy Newman’s Dixieland jazz soundtrack, they make their way through the mystical, adventurous bayous of Louisiana to find the magical antidote and become human again.

Age recommendation: 8+. Content Advisory: scary images.

Gazette Classification: Film
Open to: Public and Harvard community
Category: Film
Library LocationHarvard Film Archive
More infohcl.harvard.edu…

Kevin Jerome Everson Short Films — Everson in Person

Harvard Film Archive
24 Quincy Street
Sat., Feb. 10, 2018, 7 – 8:30 p.m.

Kevin Jerome Everson Short Films — Everson in Person

Round Seven: Rigorously divided into seven parts corresponding to the seven rounds fought between boxers Art McKnight and Sugar Ray Leonard in a 1978 Mansfield match, Round Seven stresses the alternately wistful, proud and frustrated recollections of losing contestant McKnight over dreamy footage of the boxer practicing his strokes in a darkened ring.

Ears, Nose and Throat: DeCarrio Antwan Couley, Everson’s son, was murdered in 2010, and Ears, Nose and Throat is the second of the director’s films (following 2016’s Shadeena) to reflect on the tragedy. As in the prior film, Everson takes a roundabout angle on the events by centering his attention on Shadeena Brooks, a woman who witnessed the incident in front of her home. Here, her trauma is manifested physically as she undergoes a hearing test at the doctor’s office, the left-to-right beeping of which becomes a crucial formal element in the film’s construction. As Shadeena recounts the story in voiceover, footage of her misidentifying the directionality of the beeping devastatingly materializes the toll of gun violence on African-American bodies.

Undefeated: In this striking single-panel sketch, a cleverly bifurcated composition shows a man on one half of the frame tending to an engine on the side of the road while another man shadowboxes on the opposite side, possibly to keep warm in the Midwestern winter. Throughout, the 16mm image skips and stutters, creating a visual analogue to the rhythm of the boxer’s gestures.

Emergency Needs: Emergency Needs centers around a press conference recorded after the Hough Riots of July 1966 with Carl B. Stokes, then Cleveland’s (and the nation’s) first Black mayor. Employing split-screen, Everson juxtaposes Stokes’s appearance against a word-for-word restaging with actress Esosa Edosomwan, provoking a heightened awareness of the moment-to-moment complexities of the high-pressure public performance.

Fe26: Everson explores petty criminality as a form of economic necessity in Fe26 by depicting a pair of copper thieves scouring the streets of East Cleveland for vulnerable manhole covers and crowbars (objects actually sculpted by the filmmaker but placed in the scene as “real”). The men describe their daily routines and struggles atop a montage of their assorted misadventures.

Company Line: Shot over a particularly snowy winter in Mansfield, Ohio, the wistful Company Line resurrects the submerged history of the town’s earliest Black neighborhood via the testimonies of past residents and local workers—among them a pensive plowman whose evening routes through the historic streets form a key structuring element. Alternating between crude prosumer video imagery and warm 16mm color footage while peppering its soundtrack with various recurrences of a hit song by a sixties African-American girl group, the film creates a poignant weave of past and present, exploring a largely forgotten community through its reverberations into the modern day.

Ninety-Three: In this wry comic miniature, a man, presumably celebrating his 93rd birthday, gradually blows out 93 candles on a cake in slow-motion, failing numerous times before finally extinguishing all remaining light.

Gazette Classification: Film
Open to: Public and Harvard community
Category: Film
Library LocationHarvard Film Archive
More infohcl.harvard.edu…

Yale Jazz Ensemble Meets The Harvard Jazz Band Live at Scullers

Scullers Jazz Club
400 Soldiers Field Rd, Boston

400 Soldiers Field Road – Boston, MA 02134
In the DoubleTree Suites by Hilton Hotel Boston – Cambridge
Sat., Feb. 10, 2018, 8 – 10 p.m.

Yale Jazz Ensemble Meets The Harvard Jazz Band Live at Scullers

The Yale Jazz Ensemble, a seventeen-piece big band, performs a wide variety of music, from pieces from Yale’s Benny Goodman archive to the newest, most progressive jazz compositions. The Ensemble has performed in the United States and internationally and has played with or opened for the Mingus Big Band, the Mel Lewis Jazz Orchestra, the Toshiko Akiyoshi/Lew Tabackin Big Band, the World Saxophone Quartet, Jane Ira Bloom, Jimmy Owens, and Branford Marsalis.

Harvard's Jazz Band has also performed world wide, including 2017 performances in Cuba and past concerts have included tributes to Herbie Hancock, Benny Golson, and many other important jazz artists. Performers in these concerts have included Terri Lyne Carrington, Lionel Loueke, Harold Mabern, George Coleman, Don Braden, and more.

Very special guests for this evening will be saxophonists Wayne Escoffery and Yosvani Terry as well as bassist Boris Koslov.

Gazette Classification: Concerts, Music
Cost: $30-$80
Ticket Web Linkwww.ticketweb.com…
Ticket Info: 617-562-4111
More infoscullersjazz.com…

Faith & Life Forum, Robert W. Lee IV

Buttrick Room in the Memorial Church
Sun., Feb. 11, 2018, 9:30 – 10:30 a.m.

Faith & Life Forum, Robert W. Lee IV

The Faith & Life Forum explores matters of faith and public life. This term, we will continue to explore the theme of "Redefining Success: Living a Life of Sacrifice and Service” through readings, discussion, interviews, and lectures. Come for coffee at 9:00 a.m.

Gazette Classification: Humanities, Religion, Support/Social
Organization/Sponsor: The Memorial Church
Speaker(s): Robert W. Lee IV, a descendant of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee, who was forced to step down as pastor of a church in North Carolina after denouncing racism and voicing support of Black Lives Matter.
Cost: Free and open to the public
Contact Info: The Memorial Church of Harvard University,, 1 Harvard Yard, Cambridge, MA 02138, P: 617-495-5508
More infomemorialchurch.harvard.edu…

Pages

You are here