The 2016-2017 W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute Fellows


The Hutchins Center for African & African American Research Announces its Fourth Class of W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute Fellows


Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the  W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute at the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, has announced twenty-four Fellows for the 2016-2017 academic year.

 

“We are delighted to welcome one of our most distinguished and diverse classes of W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute Fellows,” says Gates. “Photography and racial mapping in South Africa and Namibia, American rhetoric and the depopulation of the Panama Canal Zone, early glass manufacturing in Nigeria, AfroAsia and Hiphop, commemorative monuments in postcolonial Jamaica, copyright and African American music, sanctuary and The Negro Motorist Green Book, and state violence against black women and girls are among the exciting projects which the 2016-2017 Class of Fellows will be pursuing at the W. E. B Du Bois Research Institute, housed in the Hutchins Center.”

The 2016-2017 W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute Fellows and their research projects are as follows:

• Harry Allen is a hiphop activist and writer. In residence as a Nasir Jones Hiphop Fellow for the 2016-2017 academic year, Mr. Allen will be at work on The Hypertext, a documentary podcast and live presentation.  

Kleber Amancio is an historian of Brazil. In residence in Spring 2017 as an Afro-Latin American Research Institute Fellow. He will be at work on his project, Afro-Brazilian Art

John Ataguba is Senior Lecturer in Health Economics at the University of Cape Town. In residence for Spring 2017 as the Mellon Mandela Fellow, Dr. Ataguba will be at work on his project Comparative Political Economy of Health Sector Reforms: Lesson for South Africa from the United States.

• Abidemi Babalola holds a doctorate in Anthropology from Rice University, Houston. In residence as the McMillan-Stewart Fellow for the 2016-2017 academic year, Dr. Babalola will be at work on his project The Early Glass Working Industry at Igbo Olokun, Ile-Ife Nigeria.

Gaiutra Bahadur is a journalist who writes about literature, gender and migration. In residence for the 2016-2017 academic year as a Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellow, she will be at work on The Woman from America, a biography of Janet Rosenberg Jagan, the President of Guyana.

David Bindman is Emeritus Professor of the History of Art at University College London.  In residence for Fall 2016 as an Image of the Black Archive & Library Fellow for Fall 2016, Dr. Bindman will be completing The Image of the Black in Africa and Asia a companion volume to the Image of the Black in Western Art series (Harvard University Press).

NoViolet Bulawayo is the Jones Lecturer in Fiction at Stanford University. In residence in Spring 2017 as the inaugural James D. Manyika Fellow, she will be at work on her novel, tentatively entitled Glory.

Jean-Christophe Cloutier is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. In residence in Spring 2017 as a Hutchins Fellow, Dr. Cloutier will be at work on Archival Vagabonds, an exploration of archival and aesthetic strategies of novelists including Claude McKay, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Patricia Highsmith, and Jack Kerouac.

• Christian Ayne Crouch is Associate Professor of Historical Studies and American Studies at Bard College. In residence for the 2016-2017 academic year as a Hutchins Fellow, Dr. Crouch will be at work on Queen Victoria's Captives, a study of the 1867-68 British military expedition to Ethiopia to rescue European hostages held by Emperor Tewodros.

Petrina Dacres is the Head of the Art History Department at the Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performance Arts in Kingston, Jamaica. In residence for the 2016-2017 academic year as the inaugural Stuart Hall Fellow, Dr. Dacres will be at work on her research project Art and Historicity: The Commemorative Public Image in Postcolonial Jamaica.

• Dawn-Elissa Fischer is Associate Professor of Africana Studies at San Francisco State University. In residence in Fall 2016 as a Nasir Jones Hiphop Fellow, Dr. Fischer will be at work on her project Racialized Sexuality and Gender Representations in Hiphop and Anime.

• Nikki A. Greene is the Assistant Professor of the Arts of Africa and the African Diaspora in the Art Department at Wellesley College. In residence for the 2016-2017 academic year as the Richard Cohen Fellow, Dr. Greene will work on her project Rhythms of Glue, Grease, Grime, and Glitter: The Body in Contemporary African American Art.

• Shaun Harper is Professor of Education and Africana Studies as well as Executive Director of the Center for the Study of Race & Equity in Education at the University of Pennsylvania and. In residence for the 2016-2017 academic year as the College Board Fellow, Dr. Harper will be at work on his project Black Undergraduate Men at Public Colleges and Universities: A National Report Card.

• Thomas Healy is Professor of Law at Seton Hall Law School. In residence in Fall 2016, as a Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellow, he will be at work on his book Soul City: Race, Equality, and the Lost Dream of an American Utopia.

John Jennings is Professor of Media and Cultural Studies, University of California, Riverside. In residence Spring 2017 as a Nasir Jones Hiphop Fellow, he will be at work on his project Remixing The Trap: Race, Space, and the Speculative South.

Al-Yasha Ilhaam is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Spelman College.  In residence in Spring 2017 as the United Negro College Fund Mellon Fellow, Dr. Ilhaam will be at work on her project Slavery through the Discipline of Philosophy.

• Marixa Lasso is Associate Professor of Latin American History at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia.  In residence Fall 2016 as a Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellow, Dr. Lasso will be a work on The Lost Towns of the Canal Zone a study of how American ideas about the environment and people of Panama led to the depopulation of the Canal Zone

Márcia Lima is Professor of Sociology at the University of São Paulo. In residence Fall 2016 as an Afro-Latin American Research Institute Fellow, Dr. Lima will be at work on her project Brazil's Racial Inequalities and Regional Variations: Recent Changes and Age-old Challenges.

Treva Lindsey is an Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at The Ohio State University. In residence for the 2016-2017 academic year as the Inaugural Research on Women and Girls of Color Fellow, Dr. Lindsay will be at work on her project Hear Our Screams: A Contemporary History of State and State Sanctioned Violence Against Black Women and Girls.

• Xolela Mangcu is Professor of Sociology at the University of Cape Town.  In residence in Fall 2016 as the Harry Oppenheimer Hutchins Fellow, Dr. Mangcu will be at work on two projects, a new biography of Nelson Mandela and a book about Chicago’s first Black mayor Harold Washington.

• Ivor Miller is Senior Lecturer at Bassey Andah Institute for African and Asian Studies at the University of Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria. In residence for the 2016-2017 academic year as the Mark Claster Mamolen Fellow, Dr. Miller will be at work on his project Cuban Lukumí Bàtá: Ajúbà to Oba Ilu.

• Ingrid Monson is Quincy Jones Professor of African-American Music and Professor of African and African American Studies at Harvard University.  In residence as a Hutchins Fellow for the 2016-2017 academic year, Dr. Monson will be at work on her project The Blurred Lines Infringement Case: Copyright and African American Music.

• Jacqueline Rivers holds a Ph.D. in African American Studies and Sociology from Harvard University. In residence for the 2016-2017 academic year as a Hutchins Fellow, Dr. Rivers will be at work on her project The Power of Racial Socialization: A Form of Non-Elite Cultural Capital.

Lorena Rizzo is a researcher and lecturer in the Department of History at the University of Bielefeld, Germany. In residence for the 2016-2017 academic year as the Oppenheimer Fellow, she will be at work on her project Shades of Difference:  Photography and the Grammar of Race in Souther Colonial Africa.

• Candacy Taylor is an author and cultural documentarian. In residence in Spring 2017 as a Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellow, she will be at work on her multimedia project Sites of Sanctuary: The Negro Motorist Green Book.  

Distinguished playwright Adrienne Kennedy joins the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research as a non-resident member of the  2016-2017 W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute Fellowship Program. She will be the Hutchins Family Fellow, following Wole Soyinka who was the inaugural recipient of this honorary fellowship in 2013-2014.

Originally founded in 1975 as the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute, the W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute has annually appointed scholars who conduct individual research for a period of up to one academic year in a variety of fields within African and African American Studies. Now at the heart of the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research, the Institute’s fellowship program accepts established and emerging scholars from both the humanities and social sciences and occasionally from fields such as engineering and the medical sciences. Fellows are participants in a range of activities including colloquia, public conferences, lectures, readings, and workshops.

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